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Leaders discuss how to tackle the Earth’s planetary crisis in the UN’s Stockholm+50

To jointly work on transformative actions and exchange tangible examples of multistakeholder collaboration to mitigate the climate crisis, H&M Group’s CEO Helena Helmersson, H&M Group’s Head of Sustainability, Leyla Ertur and H&M Group’s Head of Public Affairs, Pernilla Halldin, participate in several panel conversations during Stockholm+50.

Platforms such as Stockholm+50 have the power to accelerate the necessary industry-wide change. I’m looking forward to further engaging with participating institutions and our industry peers on our journey towards a more sustainable fashion industry.

Helena Helmersson, CEO H&M Group

Five decades after the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) gathers the global environmental community in Stockholm, Sweden, called Stockholm+50, to work on solutions for climate, nature, and pollution.

By further sharpening the group’s climate goals and committing to achieving net-zero by 2040 and having a net positive impact on biodiversity, H&M Group has once more emphasized the significance of its climate work as a fundamental component for long-term business success.

Key actions include the long-term phase out of coal from the supply chain and an absolute emission reduction of 56% of scope 1,2 and 3 emissions by 2030. The transition to renewable energy and improved energy efficiency, the work to restore biodiversity and to transform to a circular fashion industry will also contribute to reducing the company’s carbon footprint. Already today, 80% of the materials sourced for H&M Group’s products are either recycled or sourced in a more sustainable way. The clear goal is to reach 100% by 2030. By the end of 2021, the share of recycled materials used has tripled from 5.8% to 17.9%.

Ahead of Stockholm+50 and in time for this year’s week of World Environmental Day, WWF, H&M Group and IKEA brought together around 30 stakeholders and business leaders at the H&M Group head office in Stockholm for a public panel event and round table discussions on biodiversity and nature loss.

Reversing nature loss is our moral duty towards earth’s diversity of life as well as critical for economic prosperity. It requires an integrated, systemic approach – including repurposing of public subsidies and private sector investment to drive action at scale. Business has a critical role to play in taking action on biodiversity and it is in their interests that they do: transitioning to a nature-positive economy will generate new business opportunities, promote job creation, secure a safe and sustainable future for all of us and all life on earth.

Marco Lambertini, Director General WWF international

Biodiversity and intact ecosystems are fundamental components for our well-being, livelihoods and our economies. Therefore, we need collaboration to solve the global challenges of nature loss.  We take responsibility to create innovative and efficient solutions through our investments, and we invite others in our industry to join these efforts. We are looking forward to further engaging in an open dialogue and collaboration with others within and outside our industry.

Leyla Ertur, Head of Sustainability H&M Group

Having biodiversity as a priority in their sustainability agenda, WWF, H&M Group and IKEA work together to advance corporate action on biodiversity and to contribute to the policy discussions leading up to the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP 15) in Kunming later this year. Summarizing the shared challenges and learnings of the half-day conference, the three partners also published an op-ed, calling for a new Global Biodiversity Framework with clear metrics and indicators as well as global cooperation on the matter.

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